I’m Just Too Busy

Too often I find myself thinking, “I’m just too busy…”

to keep up with friends.

to get all my work done.

to read my bible.

to rest.

to engage people like I want to.

The reality is we live in a culture that is moving faster and faster. And things don’t seem to be slowing down any time soon!

In his book “Faster: The Acceleration of Just About Everything” sociologist James Gleick talks about this “ever growing urgency” in our culture. He argues that the technology-driven Western world has produced a “multi-tasking, channel-flipping, fast-forwarding species.”

Interestingly, in his research, he discovered that the more affluent you are, the more likely you are to be anxious about time. He writes, “…increasing wealth and increasing education bring a sense of tension about time. We believe that we possess too little of it; and that is a myth we all live by now.”

And so my question is, “Is there a breaking point?”

How much can one person do in one day?

The Bible says that time is precious – a rare commodity. It says, “Don’t be a fool. Use your head. Make the most of every chance you get!” (Eph 5:16) In the original King James translation it uses this beautiful phrase – learn to “redeem the time.”

And so how do we do that? How do we regain or recover that which is taken from us every day by a million other demands and pressures? I have some ideas which I’ll write about in my next blog, but what are your thoughts?

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